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Book Reviews - Want to know what our librarians and staff are reading? Browse through a variety of book reviews added to our catalog from a variety of genres. Subscribe
There Are 26 Reviews | Showing 1 to 10
Slightly bad girls of the Bible : flawed women loved by a flawless God Book Cover
Slightly bad girls of the Bible : flawed women loved by a flawless God by Higgs, Liz Curtis.
Reviewed by G (Jun 5, 2014)
Excellent, this author know how to correlate, the old and the new, the past and the present, untainted with the tainted, she opines just so, not overwhelming me with unnecessary comments. Any woman living today can get help,and or understand how our today lives mimic and reflect on the past live of our biblical ancestors. This book need to be written. Thank you Liz
 
 
Slightly bad girls of the Bible : flawed women loved by a flawless God Book Cover
Slightly bad girls of the Bible : flawed women loved by a flawless God by Higgs, Liz Curtis.
Reviewed by G (Jun 5, 2014)
Excellent, this author know how to correlate, the old and the new, the past and the present, untainted with the tainted, she opines just so, not overwhelming me with unnecessary comments. Any woman living today can get help,and or understand how our today lives mimic and reflect on the past live of our biblical ancestors. This book need to be written. Thank you Liz
 
 
Robbing the bees : a biography of honey, the sweet liquid gold that seduced the world Book Cover
Robbing the bees : a biography of honey, the sweet liquid gold that seduced the world by Bishop, Holley.
Reviewed by Laura M (May 8, 2014)
A unique perspective on the relationship between people and bees. Sections about the history of honey as food and in recipes, kinds of bees and honey, the bee in art and culture and methods of beekeeping through the ages. All this is intermingled with an account of a modern commercial beekeeper and the author's journey to become a beekeeper herself. It is also wrapped up in lovely prose so that, if you choose, you can read the work as a meditation on the importance of bees and pollinating insects and reflect on the impact of humans on nature. But the work is admonition-free and you may enjoy it simply for its inherent information and delightful turn of phrase.
 
 
App Inventor Book Cover
App Inventor by Wolber, David.
Reviewed by Tamoul Q (Feb 23, 2012)
This is available only through OverDrive, our electronic e-book media, but it's well worth the effort. This is the book you want at your finger tips when the MIT version of the free in-browser application App Inventor goes live.

In this case you will want to work in two browser windows:one to have the e-book open and one to manipulate the in-browser app. The book will walk you through setting up your environment, working with an emulator, construting your content, signing and packaging your finished app, and much more.

This is a must-have for anyone who is interested in creating an application for the Android operating system but was afraid to learn to code!
 
Tags:  5 Stars (LOVED it), Science
 
3D for iPhone apps with Blender and SIO2 : your guide to creating 3D games and more with open-source software Book Cover
3D for iPhone apps with Blender and SIO2 : your guide to creating 3D games and more with open-source software by Mullen, Tony, 1971-
Reviewed by Tamoul Q (Nov 21, 2011)
Are you the next great game or application inventor? Don't have the big bucks to shell out for one of those big named CAD software Packages? There is a free, open source solution to your 3d animation and gaming creation needs. This book focus on the iphone and takes a simple but powerful, stright forward approach to walking through the development process. Blender can be used on PC, Linux and most Apple computers. Your invention might just be the next big thing since Angry Birds!
 
Tags:  5 Stars (LOVED it), Science
 
Absolute beginner's guide to programming Book Cover
Absolute beginner's guide to programming by Perry, Greg M.
Reviewed by Tamoul Q (Nov 21, 2011)
Don't know a thing about programming languages? Neither did I when I enrolled in my first computer programming class. This book helped me hit the ground running. There are a large number of languages used to program applications for computers. Basically, programming involves knowing which set of special characters and text to combine in order to "speak" to the computer's central processing unit. Your computer only understands 1 and 0. Setting up the text editors and compilers, learning to troubleshoot your code errors, and running the program files are hardest parts of the process.

This book explains the structure commands require to be converted into machine code and shows the most common mistakes new programmers make. A good starting resource for anyone even thinking about getting to programming languages.
 
Tags:  5 Stars (LOVED it), Science
 
The book of codes : understanding the world of hidden messages : an illustrated guide to signs, symbols, ciphers, and secret languages Book Cover
The book of codes : understanding the world of hidden messages : an illustrated guide to signs, symbols, ciphers, and secret languages by Lunde, Paul, 1943-
Reviewed by Kay W (Nov 19, 2011)
This is a visually-enticing introduction to the concept, history of, and application of, codes. Because it covers so much territory, it covers many topics, with each one covered quickly. What is missing is enough overview material to fully integrate all these topics into a properly coherent whole. This weakness, however, is forgotten when contemplating the book's key strength -- its colorful, dynamic parade of engaging illustrations. One can get so wrapped up in the visual delights that all else fades away. Therefore--recommeded.
 
 
Sams teach yourself Java 2 in 24 hours Book Cover
Sams teach yourself Java 2 in 24 hours by Cadenhead, Rogers.
Reviewed by Tamoul Q (Nov 18, 2011)
Whenever you scroll over content on a web page, click a link to another site, or fill in user information on an online form you are using Java. All those interesting games on the Web require Java functions to come alive.

Another reason to learn Java is that source code created for one application can be reused in many others.

You may want to run a single program on widely different platforms such as iOS (Apple), Windows (Microsoft) or Gingerbread (Android). Java’s open source object orientated structure will make that happen. This book will take you from setting up the work environment, to coding your introduction to the World. Jump in and have fun. No you will not master the language in 24hrs but you will be on the road to serious understanding and creating fun programs in 24 sessions. This book uses very easy to understand language and provides step by step examples for each project.
 
Tags:  5 Stars (LOVED it), Science
 
Metropolitan paradise : the struggle for nature in the city : Philadelphia's Wissahickon Valley, 1620-2020 Book Cover
Metropolitan paradise : the struggle for nature in the city : Philadelphia's Wissahickon Valley, 1620-2020 by Contosta, David R.
Reviewed by Kay W (Nov 15, 2011)

This is a 4 volume set, and this is a review of Volume 2.

Volume 2 looks at the history of Pennsylvania's Wissahickon watershed from approx. 1850-1940. This is the period during which most of what we now consider the area was developed. It was also the period during which Philadelphia's Fairmont Park incoroprated much of the lower Wissahickon, that what is now Northwest Philly became part of the city, and that a distinctive Wissahickon style came into being.

Contosta and Franklin present these and other events and influences in a series of illustrated and illustrative vignettes that allow them to convey a lot of information in little space. In short, for anyone with any interest or affection for this area, this book will be a welcome feast for the heart, the mind and the eye.
 
 
Descartes' bones : a skeletal history of the conflict between faith and reason Book Cover
Descartes' bones : a skeletal history of the conflict between faith and reason by Shorto, Russell.
Reviewed by Kay W (Nov 7, 2011)
What an odd subject, made fascinating and illuminating by the author's inquisitive mind and sturdy, deceptively simple, prose style. By historically tracking the physical remains of the man who's skeptical approach led to "cognito ergo sum," the author traces how the West has dealt with the mind/body conundrum since the 17th century to now. Not only that but his parting words, on how the path of the heart has embodied western unitive wisdom from earliest times till now, and will continue to even as the mind/brain debate throws up more heat than light, shows the author's deep knowledge of western culture. Well worth reading for almost anyone who is interested in what it means to be human.