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There Are 64 Reviews | Showing 1 to 10
Conversion Book Cover
Conversion by Howe, Katherine
Reviewed by Teresa G (Aug 26, 2014)
Katherine Howe, descendant of three women accused of witchcraft during the Salem witch trials, one of whom was hanged, returns to the subject once again. Conversion is two stories in one--the story of the young women who started the tragedy that is the Salem witch trials and the story of a similar occurrence taking place in an elite private school for girls. Based loosely on LeRoy Mystery Illness of 2012 in which high school girls in LeRoy, NY became afflicted with inexplicable twitches, disordered speech and ambulatory issues. Drawing a parallel between what happened in 17th Century Salem and a similar modern affliction, Howe gets into the minds of her characters. The modern story draws the reader in and propels the story along. What is causing this phenomenon? It is environmental, psychological, or is it a hoax? Well-written and true to historic details. The conclusion is plausible for both the modern story and the historical events which took place in the 17th Century.
 
Tags: Teen,  4 Stars (liked it)
 
Slightly bad girls of the Bible : flawed women loved by a flawless God Book Cover
Slightly bad girls of the Bible : flawed women loved by a flawless God by Higgs, Liz Curtis.
Reviewed by G (Jun 5, 2014)
Excellent, this author know how to correlate, the old and the new, the past and the present, untainted with the tainted, she opines just so, not overwhelming me with unnecessary comments. Any woman living today can get help,and or understand how our today lives mimic and reflect on the past live of our biblical ancestors. This book need to be written. Thank you Liz
 
 
Slightly bad girls of the Bible : flawed women loved by a flawless God Book Cover
Slightly bad girls of the Bible : flawed women loved by a flawless God by Higgs, Liz Curtis.
Reviewed by G (Jun 5, 2014)
Excellent, this author know how to correlate, the old and the new, the past and the present, untainted with the tainted, she opines just so, not overwhelming me with unnecessary comments. Any woman living today can get help,and or understand how our today lives mimic and reflect on the past live of our biblical ancestors. This book need to be written. Thank you Liz
 
 
Picture Me Gone Book Cover
Picture Me Gone by Rosoff, Meg
Reviewed by Teresa G (Jan 13, 2014)
Mila and her father have planned a trip from their home in London to New York state to visit Mila's father's life-long best friend, Matthew. Just before they are due to arrive Matthew disappears without a trace. He leaves behind his newborn child, his elderly dog and his wife. Mila has a talent which allows her to sense the undercurrents in a situation and with her father's help they set out to find out what has happened to Matthew. While Picture Me Gone is fast paced I found I didn't like any of the characters all that much. Mila's father is a stereotypical "absent minded professor" type and is annoying. Their life is just too perfect for my taste. The family doesn't seem real, nor does the situation they find themselves in. Matthew, while a totally unlikable character, at least seems pathetically real.
 
Tags:  3 Stars (it was ok), Teen
 
Shadows Book Cover
Shadows by McKinley, Robin
Reviewed by Teresa G (Oct 31, 2013)
Maggie doesn't like her mother's new husband. She sees 'shadows' when she looks closely at him. He is from a world where magic is still practiced and she is supicious of his reasons for resettling in here world where the magic gene is spliced out of everyone. But, as time goes on, she learns that he is not the only one in her world who has magical abilities, including herself. All of the hidden practitioners of magic must come out of the shadows and unite in order to save their world from destruction. Shadows is not Robin McKinley's best work, unfortunately. I found it confusing and boring. The author uses many terms and phrases unique to her created world and this made the plot and dialogue difficult to follow at times. The "snappy" teen dialogue didn't ring true. The romantic element seemed rushed and contrived.
 
 
Eleanor & Park Book Cover
Eleanor & Park by Rowell, Rainbow
Reviewed by Teresa G (Sep 25, 2013)
Eleanor and Park is an intense teenage love story about two misfits who slowly open up to each other over the course of a school year. Eleanor is the new girl and is, to the teens on the schoolbus, weird. Park is the only one who even tries to befriend her. Over time they come to learn that they share the same dreams for music, books and, yes, each other. Eleanor is dealing with some serious issues at home with her stepdad, Richie. Her mother is no help even when Richie's behavior is clearly out of line. As Eleanor begins to open up to Park, she realizes she is strong enough to take control of her life. With Park's help she makes a decision that will change the course of many lives, but is the one way to save her own. Set in 1986, this story has just enough period detail to make it realistic, but not so much that it becomes a "nostalgia novel" whose story is overpowered by time and place. Poingnant, funny and wholly believable, Eleanor and Park is sure to live on in the reader's memory long after the last page is turned.
 
Tags:  5 Stars (LOVED it), Teen
 
Starting From Here Book Cover
Starting From Here by Bigelow, Lisa Jenn
Reviewed by Teresa G (May 7, 2013)
Starting From Here is the story of a high school girl who is growing up on her own after her mother's death from cancer. Colby Bingham's father loves her, but he is a long-haul trucker and isn't able to be home very much. Colby is afraid to love again after the loss of her mother, but can't help herself when a stray dog crosses her path. Mo is critically injured and needs amputation surgery which a local vet provides free of charge in exchange for a promise from Colby that she will pay for the medicine, food, and other care Mo needs to survive. Right before Mo came into her life, Colby also suffered the loss of her first love, her girlfriend Rachel. As Colby begins to build a new life with Mo Colby meets and is attracted to a girl, Amelia, who interviews her about Mo's miraculous recovery for the school newpaper. Fresh, honest, and full of quirky, but very realistic characters, Starting From Here is a delight to read.
 
Tags: Teen,  5 Stars (LOVED it)
 
The colossus rises Book Cover
The colossus rises by Lerangis, Peter.
Reviewed by Mary M (Apr 25, 2013)
Jack McKinley, 13 years old, is captured by a group of scientists that live in another tri-dimensional space. The doctors of the Karai Institute wants to help Jack to survive to a rare genetic condition that only the personnel of this hospital knows how to treat it. After the surgery, Jack will have special powers and skills to combat the monster of a lost civilization.

In the story, the author of the book, Peter Lerangis explores the imagination of the reader with a chain of clues and symbolisms that are given in the form of reverse words and artwork fragments. The lector must pay attention to these details in order to discover all the pieces of the puzzle and solve the mystery clue that encapsulates the tale. Adventure is the main component of the story! As the tale progresses, the young lector will get deeper into the protagonists’ personality and their way of resolving a problem: the main goal is to defeat the monster of the Atlantis. In the fifty-one chapters the reader will feel empathetic about the challenges that Jack and his team have to go through in order to accomplish their mission. They must return safe to planet earth to unfold the mysteries of the unknown.


 
Tags:  3 Stars (it was ok), Teen
 
The Wicked and the Just Book Cover
The Wicked and the Just by Coats, Jillian Anderson
Reviewed by Teresa G (Apr 1, 2013)
Set in Wales in the late 13th century, The Wicked and the Just leaves the reader pondering the question of who, in this book, was the wicked and who was the just. Cecily, a young English girl, must make a home for herself when her father accepts a position as a burgess in Caernarvon, a remote outpost where the native Welsh must be kept under control. Cecily doesn't fit in with the other English girls, but her attitude towards the Welsh makes her no friends, there, either. Lording her power over the local girl, Gwenhwyfar, who works in the house, Cecily's cruelty pushes Gwenhwyfar to her limit. When crops fail and famine results, the Welsh subjects can starve no longer. The tables are turned on the English and Cecily finds herself at the mercy of Gwenhwyfar. This is a thought-provoking book without a single character who is likeable. This made it difficult to feel the characters were genuine. But the underlying story is a powerful one--when pushed beyond all limits, do the wicked become the just?
 
 
Aristotle and Dante discover the secrets of the universe Book Cover
Aristotle and Dante discover the secrets of the universe by Sáenz, Benjamin Alire.
Reviewed by Joel N (Mar 28, 2013)
Two teenagers who couldn't seem more different (skin color, sexuality, class status, language spoken at home, etc.) end up making one of the strongest, most believable and indelible connections in YA fiction. Winner of this year's Stonewall YA Award as well as the Pura Belpre Award and many other honors, and you won't be able to put it down.
 
Tags:  5 Stars (LOVED it), Teen