Lawncrest Library

Lawncrest Library is temporarily closed.

Wednesday, November 18 – Message from Staff

In the interest of limiting the impact and spread of COVID-19, all Free Library buildings are closed to the public effective Friday, November 20. Our Hot Spots remain closed to the public as well.

While buildings will remain closed, several Free Library locations will resume offering contactless material pickups and returns on Monday, November 30, subject to Philadelphia Department of Public Health guidance. Visit our Services page or call your neighborhood library to see what's available. (This page is updated daily, so please check it regularly.)

You can place new holds with the Free Library! Sign in to freelibrary.org with your library card number and PIN to place a hold online, or call your neighborhood library to place a hold over the phone. Once your materials are ready, we'll contact you to schedule a pickup appointment.

All returned materials are being quarantined for 7 days due to COVID-19 safety precautions. If you have returned materials to your neighborhood library within the last 7-10 days and they are still showing as overdue in your account, the materials are likely still being quarantined. All materials will be recorded as returned after quarantine is complete. In the meantime, you may still place holds online and renew any renewable items (those not on hold by another patron).

The Free Library call center is live! Patrons can call five days a week to speak with our expert staff, who will provide information, technology help, Library updates, and more. Calling is free! Give us a dial at 1-833-TALK FLP (825-5357). We're here Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday, 10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m., and Wednesday, 10:00 a.m.–8:00 p.m.

Many Free Library programs are proceeding virtually.

We maintain robust digital resources that you can access anywhere with your library card, including ebooks, audiobooks, movies, TV, music, over 100 databases, and the New York Times online.

6098 Rising Sun Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19111-6009
Rising Sun Ave. & Comly Street

Upcoming Events

Help Design the Lawncrest Library!

Sat, December 5, 2020 12:00 P.M.

"Help Design the Lawncrest Recreation Center & Library!" "We invite community members to attend one of two kick off events to celebrate the launch of Rebuild Lawncrest Recreation Center and Library." 1) In-Person Open House in the Grove (area between the recreation center…

Virtual-Help Design the Lawncrest Library!

Wed, December 9, 2020 6:00 P.M.

"Help Design the Lawncrest Recreation Center & Library!" "We invite community members to attend one of two kick off events to celebrate the launch of Rebuild Lawncrest Recreation Center and Library." 1) In-Person Open House in the Grove (area between the recreation center…

About

This branch serves the communities of Lawndale, Crescentville, Lawncrest, and Cedar Grove.

History

The neighborhood of Lawndale was named after Lawndale and Company, a turn-of-the-century developer. Crescentville was named for the Crescent Factory, an early 19th-century rope plant. The whole region was once in Oxford Township, and became part of the city in 1854.

The Lawncrest branch came into being as the result of activism by a small number of concerned citizens. In March 1957, Mildred Pruitt launched a campaign to get a branch library constructed for the Lawndale and Crescentville sections of northeast Philadelphia. Library service in these communities was limited to weekly visits by the bookmobile. Students were forced to rely on the heavily used Greater Olney and Bushrod branches to complete school assignments and research.

Pruitt organized community meetings, started a petition drive at neighborhood schools and businesses, and founded the Lawn-Crest Library Association. The name of this group reflected the needs of both neighborhoods for full-time library service.

In April 1957, Free Library Director Emerson Greenaway addressed representatives of neighborhood civic groups at the Lawncrest Recreation Center. He outlined the steps needed to get a new library built. In May 1957, the library submitted a plan to build a new branch in Lawndale.

The Planning Commission turned down the library's proposal for the 1958 capital budget; instead recommending that funds be allocated from the 1961 capital budget with construction to begin in 1963. Through the intervention of Councilman John M. McDevitt, City Council nevertheless allocated funds for the proposed branch library from the 1958 capital budget. Construction began in August, 1960.

The Lawncrest Branch library opened its doors on September 18, 1961.The site chosen for the branch was city-owned land adjacent to the Lawncrest Recreation Center on Rising Sun Avenue at Comly Street.

The library was renovated in 2000 as part of the "Changing Lives" campaign, which refurbished branches and brought Internet service to every library.