The circumference at the lip is 12 feet; the circumference of the crown is 7 feet, 6 inches; the height from lip to crown is 3 feet; the length of the clapper is 3 feet, 2 inches; the thickness at the lip is 3 inches; the thickness at the crown is 1 ¼ inches, and the bell weighs 2,080 pounds.

Source: Ring in the Jubilee: The Epic of America's Liberty Bell, 1973, p.48, Charles Michael Boland, 917.481 B637R

The Liberty Bell was originally known as the State House Bell.

Source: Ring in the Jubilee: The Epic of America's Liberty Bell, 1973, p.53, Charles Michael Boland, 917.481 B637R

"PROCLAIM LIBERTY THROUGHOUT ALL THE LAND UNTO ALL THE INHABITANTS THEREOF-LEV. XXV X/ BY ORDER OF THE ASSEMBLY OF THE PROVINCE OF PENSYLVANIA [sic] FOR THE STATE HOUSE IN PHILADa"

Source: From the National Park Service website accessed 3/17/2006.

The Sesquicentennial Exposition was a world's fair to celebrate our country's 150th anniversary. It was held mainly at League Island Park at the bottom of Broad Street in South Philadelphia. Paul Phillipe Cret designed the physical layout, which included an 80 foot tall replica of the Liberty Bell covered in 26,000 light bulbs at the entrance. The fair was a financial disaster but the grounds were later developed into FDR Park, Marconi Plaza, the Packer park neighborhood and the sports complex.



Source: Sesquicentennial International Exposition (1926).http://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org.philadelphiaencyclopedia.org

The Liberty Bell was declared permanently out of commission when, after repairs had been attempted, it was rung in honor of Washington's Birthday in 1846. It has not been fully rung since.

Source: Ring in the Jubilee: The Epic of America's Liberty Bell, 1973.p.94, Charles Michael Boland, 917.481 B637R

It was first read near what is now Independence Square and was then the Univ. of Penn., by John Nixon on July 8th, 1776. The Liberty Bell was rung, as a crowd of 8,000 went wild.

Source: Philly Firsts: The Famous, Infamous, and Quirky of the City of Brotherly Love, 1999, p.1, Janice L. Booker, 974.811 B644P

The Liberty Bell was originally meant to be hung in the tower of the State House in Philadelphia in order to call members to the meetings. The State House is now known as Independence Hall. In July 1852 it was placed upon a temporary pedestal in Independence Hall. In 1885 it began a series of journeys across the United States. It has not left Philadelphia since 1917. It is now located in the Liberty Bell Center on Market Street between 5th and 6th Streets.

Source: Ring in the Jubilee: The Epic of America's Liberty Bell, 1973, p.21,103, 107, 113, Charles Michael Boland, 917.481 B637R, See also the National Park Service website.