Haddington Library

446 North 65th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19151-4003
(65th St. & Girard Ave.)
215-685-1970

Closed Today

Sunday, 5/28 Closed
Monday, 5/29 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Closed
Tuesday, 5/30 11:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday, 5/31 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Thursday, 6/1 11:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Friday, 6/2 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Saturday, 6/3 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
  • * Monday has hour changes – Memorial Day
Sunday Closed
Monday 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Tuesday 11:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Wednesday 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Thursday 11:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Friday 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Saturday 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Upcoming Closures

  • Mon., May. 29 : Closed Memorial Day
  • Thu., Jun. 8 : Closed staff development day
  • Thu., Jun. 22 : Opening at 2:00 PM Due to staff development.
  • Tue., Jul. 4 : Closed Independence Day
  • Thu., Jul. 27 : Opening at 2:00 PM Due to staff development.
View all holiday closings

Photo of Haddington Library

Facilities

  • Baby changing station
  • Computers for public use
  • Electrical outlets available
  • Handicapped accessible
  • Photocopier (black/white)
  • Printing (black/white)
  • Public restrooms
  • Street parking (free)
  • Water fountain
  • Wireless internet access (wi/fi)

Location

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Upcoming Events

Wooden Block Party

Sat, Jun 10, 10:30 A.M.

Young children and their parents are invited to attend this creative play session featuring wooden blocks.

Philly Bop Ballroom Dance Class

Sat, Jun 10, 2:30 P.M.

Join us to learn the "Philly Bop," a style of dance created by African Americans out of 1920's Lindy Hop, Jitterbug, and East Coast…

Friends of Haddington Library Café for Children and Teens

Mon, Jun 12, 4:00 P.M.

Join us for a special Friends’ Café celebrating the last week of school and the start of summer vacation. Sponsored by Friends of…

Summer Reading Kickoff

Mon, Jun 12, 4:00 P.M.

Receive a prize when you sign up for the Summer of Wonder game.

Wooden Block Party

Mon, Jul 3, 10:30 A.M.

Young children and their parents are invited to attend this creative play session featuring wooden blocks.

Science in the Summer 2017 - Science of Sports!

Tue, Jul 18, 10:00 A.M.

GSK Science in the Summer™ is a fun and free science education program sponsored by GSK and administered by The Franklin…

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About

Located at the top of a hill, the library serves the communities of Haddington-Carroll Park and Overbrook-Morris Park. You can climb the front steps to the stately main entrance of the building or use the elevator located inside the side entrance on Girard Avenue.

History

First appearing on an 1816 map of Philadelphia, Haddington was named for the country town of Haddingtonshire in England. The village of Haddington, centered around 62nd Street above Arch Street, consisted of a dozen houses and a coach stop inn called the Whitesides.

By 1865, passengers could take the West Philadelphia Passenger Railway, which traveled out down Haverford Avenue to 54th Street, then south to Vine, then west to 66th Street before returning to the depot. With the opening of the Market Elevated line in 1907, small shopping districts developed along Market Street. The shopping district around the 60th Street El stop, bounded by Market and Chestnut Streets, and by 60th and 61st Streets, was later designated as the Haddington Historic District and listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Haddington Branch of the Free Library opened on December 3, 1915. Albert Kelsey, an architect who chaired the committee to develop the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, designed the building. Haddington was the 18th library building erected using funds from Andrew Carnegie. Land for the library was donated by Alex Simpson, Jr.

The Old Academy Bell, which was a school bell at the "Yellow School House," a block away from the library, still sits in the main reading room. A mural inside the branch recreates the outside courtyard and depicts neighborhood children at play.

The library was renovated in 2001 as part of the "Changing Lives" campaign, which brought Internet service to every branch.