Learn more about…


Lists


Reviews

  • Larger than life a novella by Picoult, Jodi,
    ★★★★☆

    This is obviously a short read but one that should not be under-estimated. The title 'Larger than Life' illustrates the bond between all life forms. Most specifically, Picoult highlights the salient and at times tumultuous bond between mother and child. Detailing Alice's undying love for rescued elephant, Lesego, underpinned by Alice's turbulent relationship with her mother, the reader is left with a book to remember for sure!

    And who wouldn't appreciate a book about elephants and Botswana. Smiling! 

    Reviewed by LaBae D on Jan 17, 2019

    Check out this item

  • The boy with the cuckoo-clock heart by Malzieu, Mathias.
    ★★★☆☆

    All in all this was a whimsical journey from 19th century Edinburgh to the land of Andalusia in search of love with a boy with unconventional heart strings. Notwithstanding Malzieu's particular descriptions of characters and events, I would have rated the book 2 stars. It was the fanciful depictions that saved the novel. 

    I would recommend for those with a propensity for love stories and magical realism.

    Reviewed by LaBae D on Jan 3, 2019

    Check out this item

  • Life is so good by Dawson, George,
    ★★★★☆

    As a 30-something African American, it's hard to imagine a time when non-whites were treated with such inhumane treatment and expected to consider themselves as less-than. Needless to say, I was appalled by certain parts of the book. But, Mr. Dawson's reaction to most situations overpowered the evilness he was faced. All who read this book will be better off because of it! This is one of those books that sticks with you through life and will make you feel a great need to work hard and do right by people- Mr. Dawson's motto!

    Reviewed by LaBae D on Jan 3, 2019

    Check out this item

  • The hate u give by Thomas, Angie,
    ★★★★★

    "Brave doesn't mean you're not scared. It means you go on even though you're scared." 
    Provoking, Intriguing, Riveting....I couldn't put it down. This book is about using your voice. Taking a stand. Understanding your power. Teens need empowerment in the necessary tools, strategies and platforms to make their voices heard. This book places just another tool in that box for teens to pull from. Angie Thomas made her mark in the literary world but most importantly she established a literary compass in the works of African Americans on this topic. 

    I commend Angie for her bravery.

    Reviewed by LaBae D on Jan 3, 2019

    Check out this item

  • The man who quit money by Sundeen, Mark,
    ★★★★☆

    This book is rather memorable, dare I say thought altering. Before my daughters were born; money didn't really hold much importance in my life as I was only responsible for myself and I lead a very simple life. BUT, when my first daughter was born money to me became this worrying necessity. Will I ever have enough? What schools will she go to? Where will I live? All of these futuristic questions began to emerge and money was the underlying, unsteady factor.  I've since had another child and I've yet to get back to my simple care-free worry-for-nothing life. I understand that worrying goes hand-in-hand with motherhood. However, reading this book made me return to a point where money has not been personified. Money is an object a means to an end. I no longer worry about spending it or if I should have saved it. I feel more free in my decision making...less affected emotionally. Notwithstanding that I have an adequate salary and savings, I still believe that after reading this book I have released the grip money had on my psyche and for that I am grateful! 

    Given this account of Suelo's money-less lifestyle, am I intrigued enough to go full throttle? No, can't see that happening. However, his life is an inspiration and an eye-opener to things I could stand to change in my lifestyle. His way of life is no way conducive to child-rearing, as much as I can see. Once my children are older and self-sufficient I WILL however, sell my home for a smaller domain possibly get rid of my car and take other larger more apparent steps toward a more simpler lifestyle. Until then, it'll have to be the small things that count. 

    A must-read!

    Reviewed by LaBae D on Jan 3, 2019

    Check out this item

  • White dog fell from the sky by Morse, Eleanor Lincoln.
    ★★★☆☆

    This book was a disappointment:( The writing was superb no qualms about that but the storyline left MUCH to be desired. As a visitor of Botswana for about 2 months I appreciated the lethargic cultural analogies and her ability to smoothly integrate Setswana phrases, euphemisms and dialog. 

    Regarding the storyline; I wanted MORE! The white dog was not a main character not that I was expecting the dog to be but I at least expected the dog to be an integral part of the climax- not so. And what climax? The book simply fizzed to a halt. The white dog while endearing in the first 100 pages was left in a depressed state awaiting Isaac's return for the remainder 250 pages. I could have done without the intrinsic details of Alice's love life and she could have certainly left out the extra characters that only made the prose that much more shallow and forgettable. I rate this book 2 stars based on her innate writing abilities and the Botswana/South Africa backdrop but would not recommend this book.

    Reviewed by LaBae D on Jan 3, 2019

    Check out this item