Lawncrest Library

Friday, September 11 – Message from Staff

We are now open for browsing and computer usage Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  A mask is required to be worn when entering the building and remain on, properly covering mouth and nose, during your visit.  We ask that you keep visits to 30 minutes to help maintain safe occupancy limits and allow for safe social distancing.

Material pick-up is available by appointment.

Our drop box is open 24/7 for material returns.  We ask that all returning material, even during open hours, be placed in the drop box.  Returned material is quarantined a minimum of 7 days before handling and still appears as checked out on your record during the quarantine period.

Want to request material? Place a reserve through the online catalog (remember to select Lawncrest as your pick-up location) or give us a call.

Staff is available Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. for phone reference, to help place reserves, and schedule material pick up appointments.

6098 Rising Sun Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19111-6009
Rising Sun Ave. & Comly Street
Closed Today
Sunday Closed
Monday 1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Tuesday Closed
Wednesday 1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Thursday Closed
Friday 1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Saturday Closed

Upcoming Closures

  • Mon., May. 31 : Closed Memorial Day
  • Sat., Jun. 19 : Closed Juneteenth
  • Sun., Jul. 4 : Closed Independence Day
  • Mon., Jul. 5 : Closed Independence Day (Observed)
View all holiday closings

Facilities

  • Bicycle rack
  • Book drop box
  • Computers for public use
  • Photocopier (black/white)
  • Printing (black/white)
  • Public restrooms
  • Street parking (free)
  • Wireless internet access (wi/fi)
  • Handicapped accessible

About

This branch serves the communities of Lawndale, Crescentville, Lawncrest, and Cedar Grove.

History

The neighborhood of Lawndale was named after Lawndale and Company, a turn-of-the-century developer. Crescentville was named for the Crescent Factory, an early 19th-century rope plant. The whole region was once in Oxford Township, and became part of the city in 1854.

The Lawncrest branch came into being as the result of activism by a small number of concerned citizens. In March 1957, Mildred Pruitt launched a campaign to get a branch library constructed for the Lawndale and Crescentville sections of northeast Philadelphia. Library service in these communities was limited to weekly visits by the bookmobile. Students were forced to rely on the heavily used Greater Olney and Bushrod branches to complete school assignments and research.

Pruitt organized community meetings, started a petition drive at neighborhood schools and businesses, and founded the Lawn-Crest Library Association. The name of this group reflected the needs of both neighborhoods for full-time library service.

In April 1957, Free Library Director Emerson Greenaway addressed representatives of neighborhood civic groups at the Lawncrest Recreation Center. He outlined the steps needed to get a new library built. In May 1957, the library submitted a plan to build a new branch in Lawndale.

The Planning Commission turned down the library's proposal for the 1958 capital budget; instead recommending that funds be allocated from the 1961 capital budget with construction to begin in 1963. Through the intervention of Councilman John M. McDevitt, City Council nevertheless allocated funds for the proposed branch library from the 1958 capital budget. Construction began in August, 1960.

The Lawncrest Branch library opened its doors on September 18, 1961.The site chosen for the branch was city-owned land adjacent to the Lawncrest Recreation Center on Rising Sun Avenue at Comly Street.

The library was renovated in 2000 as part of the "Changing Lives" campaign, which refurbished branches and brought Internet service to every library.