New Study Shows Books are Still Close to Kids’ Hearts

By Shannon G RSS Wed, August 13, 2008

Bibliophiles can breathe a sigh of relief—it doesn’t look like good ol’ fashioned bound books are going anywhere just yet. A recent study by conducted by Scholastic and TSC reveals that a majority of kids and teens ages 5 to 17 will always want to read books printed on paper. As technology continues to grow and expand, many have begun to wonder what the future of the hardback holds. As it turns out, 75 percent of the children polled agreed with the statement, “No matter what I can do online, I’ll always want to read books printed on paper.” Similarly, 62 percent of respondents said they prefer to read books printed on paper rather than on a computer or handheld device. The survey also found that the kids who are most likely to read for fun every day are the same kids who turn to the internet to further their reading experiences by visiting book and author websites or connecting with fellow readers.


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Now, if I can only get my sons to read as much as they play video games!
Lori - Philadelphia
Tuesday, August 19, 2008

That's really interesting. As a 20 year old, I am always looking for print materials. I'm a senior in college, and my teacher even commented that I am probably one of her only students who uses sources that are not found on the internet, such as books. I also have to agree with using the internet to find more books. I am always on Amazon or author's websites, trying to find new books to read and get greatly disappointed when the Free Library does not have them, and I have to find them else where, which is the majority of the time.
Joy - Philadelphia
Sunday, September 28, 2008

My guess is that everyone will continue to read books. Books are so easy to carry around. Background Checks Online
Jimmy - Georgia
Tuesday, September 30, 2008

http://www.egitimcafe.com
cris - Example: arizona
Sunday, October 12, 2008

This is good news. My daughter is two and splits her attention between her traditional books and trying to read daddy's computer. I read everything online and worry that she may not realize that I'm reading too! I want to set a good example.
John - Chicago
Thursday, October 16, 2008

yo waz up i love the library its such a coool places to learn i love library
shenia - Example: Philadelphia
Monday, December 1, 2008


Diane - Cincinnati, Ohio
Sunday, December 7, 2008

My apologies for the blank comment just prior... I am pleasantly and happily surprised to see the statistic is so high for children still wanting to read from a book vs the internet. I really expected that number to be less than 50%. It is the responsibility of all parents and teachers everywhere to be sure that children continue to see positive examples of people enjoying books, and to share the enjoyment of a book with the children in our lives.
Diane - Cincinnati, Ohio
Sunday, December 7, 2008

My two daughters love to read, but they love holding a book more than reading online. It's more intimate that way.
Pam - Philadelphia
Monday, December 22, 2008

Thousands of schools, libraries, community centers, and more participate by bringing together kids and books, Kids like reading books but They rather play games online.
- CA
Tuesday, April 7, 2009

nice keep on reading kids.
- ca
Tuesday, April 7, 2009

OK - So with two kids myself, I was really happy to read this post. I am so worried about knowing what to do about letting them use the internet for their homework (schools idea - not ours)and my fear(perhaps outdated) that you can't really beat the hunt for data from a book or paper article (it's the scientist in me) The fact that reading paper was not negatively influenced by reading on the web (they already wear !) But thanks for your posting and the information that you are sharing
Jackson - Idaho
Friday, April 10, 2009


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Monday, April 20, 2009

This is good for our children.
Andy - New York
Thursday, June 25, 2009

The majority of children and teens aged 5 to 17 will always want to read books printed on paper. I think because of reading books, compared with the eBook, they can more quickly and understand the meaning and essence of the book.
Rusdi - Indonesia
Tuesday, July 7, 2009

I prefer to read books printed on paper. I love the old books but I read too.
Alvaro - Montevideo
Thursday, September 10, 2009

My kids school keep telling us (Infant school) that the best teaching tools at home are a wipeable whiteboard for them to practise on and a book of nursery rhymes. these two tools help with early literacy, writing and language skills. We have found them useful+++
Steve - Cornwall
Friday, September 11, 2009

I totally agree. My oldest daughter was bought a kindle by her uncle, but after a couple of weeks reverted back to reading hard copy books! Long live the book! Emily
Emily - Boston
Tuesday, October 6, 2009

personally I agree with the data . Its hard to replace Paper books with . You cant read too many pages in online books and books can be carried anywhere.
vikas - India
Saturday, October 17, 2009

personally I agree with the data . Its hard to replace Paper books with [url=http://freeonlinebookstore.org]online books[/url] . You cant read too many pages in online books and books can be carried anywhere.
vikas - India
Saturday, October 17, 2009

"A recent study by conducted by Scholastic and TSC reveals that a majority of kids and teens ages 5 to 17 will always want to read books printed on paper." With the Kindle being the number selling item in all of Amazon, I wonder if we need another survey. Not only that but universities across the country now have Kindle and Kindle DX units available for checkout, with Kindles already uploaded with quite a selection of popular .
dylan thomas - washington dc
Sunday, November 29, 2009

"A recent study by conducted by Scholastic and TSC reveals that a majority of kids and teens ages 5 to 17 will always want to read books printed on paper." With the Kindle being the number selling item in all of Amazon, I wonder if we need another survey. Not only that but universities across the country now have Kindle and Kindle DX units available for checkout, with Kindles already uploaded with quite a selection of popular reading[url]http://government-education.info-scene.com[/url].
dylan thomas - washington d.c.
Sunday, November 29, 2009

A recent study by conducted by Scholastic and TSC reveals that a majority of kids and teens ages 5 to 17 will always want to read books printed on paper. With the Kindle being the number selling item in all of Amazon, I wonder if we need another survey. Not only that but universities across the country now have Kindle and Kindle DX units available for checkout, with Kindles already uploaded with quite a selection of popular .
dylan thomas - washington dc
Sunday, November 29, 2009

Amazon's Kindle wireless reader had a huge hurtle to overcome in order to become more than just a gimmicky gadget that would be forgotten in a couple months after its glitzy launch. There's something about going to the store, purchasing a hardcopy book, and rifling through the pages that e-books have never been able to compete with. Most of the backlash stems from the fact that the platforms on which those books have been displayed historically haven't been up to the task. The screens are too small, too bright, look too much like computers, and make you feel as if you're still jacked into the high-tech matrix that traps us all every day of our working life. Essentially, people buy books to get away from computers. What's more, "book people" love books. How could the Kindle overcome that?
pierre - france
Thursday, March 11, 2010

I think that as technology grows. You will see more hand help readers like the kindle for kids. The Gameboy and Play station have handhelds for kids. I am sure that book companies will come out with something. Converting books to these ereader formats is becoming more and more common.
Chris - Salt Lake
Saturday, April 10, 2010

I think that as technology grows. You will see more hand help readers like the kindle for kids. The Gameboy and Play station have handhelds for kids. I am sure that book companies will come out with something. Converting books to these ereader formats is becoming more and more common.
Chris - Salt Lake
Saturday, April 10, 2010

I think that as technology grows. You will see more hand help readers like the kindle for kids. The Gameboy and Play station have handhelds for kids. I am sure that book companies will come out with something. Converting books to these ereader formats is becoming more and more common.
Chris - Salt Lake
Saturday, April 10, 2010

So nice your blog for sharing.Thanks.by
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Thursday, June 17, 2010

Books on paper are my personal choice too. Even if companies give for Kindle, it would be difficult to leave the traditional way of learning we got since childhood.
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Monday, August 2, 2010

Books on paper are my personal choice too. Even if companies give http://www.AmazonHi.com/ for Kindle, it would be difficult to leave the traditional way of learning we got since childhood.
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Monday, August 2, 2010

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