Reviews

Want to know what our librarians and staff are reading? Browse through a variety of reviews added to our catalog from a variety of genres.

Showing 1 to 20 of 1,119

Filter

  • The Girl on the Train by Hawkins, Paula
    ★☆☆☆☆

    Reviewed by Teresa G on Mar 31, 2017

    Tagged: Fiction

    Yes there is a major twist at the end.  Yes the author keeps the reader guessing about what happened to Megan Hipwell. Yes there are plenty of surprises in store.  But what this book lacks is a SINGLE likeable character.  They are all rather pathetic and maladjusted each in their own way.  Dark, dreary, and depressing.  

    Check out this item

  • The Lost City of Z : A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon by Grann, David
    ★★★★☆

    Reviewed by Teresa G on Mar 31, 2017

    Tagged: History

    The Lost City of Z is an enthralling account of one man's obsession.  Set during. the age of exploration in the early twentieth century, this book chronicles Percy Fawcett's life-long passion to find the mythical and magical lost city of Z deep within the Amazonian jungle.  His quest ultimately led to his disappearance along with that of his son, Jack, and Jack's friend, Raleigh Rimell.  Since their disappearance many other adventurers have gone into one of the most inhospitable places on earth to search for clues as to what happened to these explorers,  It seems, at long last, the author has come up with an extremely plausible explanation.  The complete truth will never be known.

    As an interesting coincidence--not long after I finished reading this book I learned that there is a movie being released chronicling Percy Fawcett's life and his quest for the lost city of Z.

    Check out this item

  • Missing, Presumed : A Novel by Steiner, Susie
    ★★☆☆☆

    Reviewed by Teresa G on Mar 31, 2017

    Tagged: Fiction

    Missing Presumed tells the story of a young woman, Edith Hind, who vanishes one day without a trace.  Manon Bradshaw, a tough, but vulnerable Detective Sergeant with the Cambridgeshire Police, is called in to investigate.  There is no dearth of suspects including Edith's friends, her boyfriend, and a mysterious stranger who inserts himself into the case--and into Manon's life.  Not even those closest to her, her parents, are immune from suspicion.  

    There are no sympathetic characters in this book thus making it difficult to care very much about what happened to Edith and how her disappearance is linked to the murder of a local youth, Taylor Dent.  Basically a waste of time.

    Check out this item

  • No Dark Place by Wolf, Joan
    ★★★★☆

    Reviewed by Teresa G on Mar 31, 2017

    Tagged: Fiction

    No Dark Place is set in Norman England, a time when allegiance could mean the difference between life and death.  When Hugh Corbaille loses his foster father, Ralf Corbaille, Sheriff of  Lincoln at the Battle of the Standard he is bereft.  When a mysterious stranger approaches one of his standard bearers claiming Hugh looks so much like the long-lost son of a powerful Earl who had been murdered thirteen years earlier, Hugh's man advises the stranger not to speak to Hugh at such an emotional time.  When the stranger comes back months later Hugh has taken over his foster-father's estates.  When the truth is revealed to Hugh, he refuses to believe this man he doesn't know.  But he agrees to go with him to meet members of his family, a family he has no recollection of.  Set during the time of Matilda's claims to the English throne over the ensconced King Stephen, this book gets at the heart of political intrigue and how the power plays of the mighty have great effect on the entire population.  

    Well-written and thoroughly researched, No Dark Place holds the reader's interest without becoming mired in historical facts.  It was a pleasant read.

    Check out this item

  • His Bloody Project : Documents Relating to the Case of Roderick Macrae, a Historical Thriller by Burnet, Graeme Macrae
    ★★★☆☆

    Reviewed by Teresa G on Mar 31, 2017

    Tagged: Fiction

    The mystery behind His Bloody Project is not who killed Lachlan Mackenzie and his two children, teenage Flora and young Donald, but why.  Written in the style of collected documents regarding the case include witness statements, newspaper articles, an account written by the murderer himself, and an account of the subsequent trial.  Set in rural Scotland in 1869, this book tells of the daily lives of the inhabitants of Culdie, Ross-shire.  In this small farming community not much changes from day to day until the day when Roderick Macrae, aged 17, brutally murdered his neighbor and parish constable, Lachlan Mackenzie and his two children.  Was Roddy Macrae a wicked young man who murdered out of vengeance?  Or were the crimes committed because of some mental disorder?  Which account of what happened is more truthful--that of Roddy himself or that put forward by agents of the court?  Was Roddy really to blame or was the real culprit the oppressive system of local governance forced upon residents of Culdie?

    Check out this item

  • The girl with the dragon tattoo by Larsson, Stieg,
    ★★★★☆

    Reviewed by LaBae D on Feb 21, 2017

    Tagged: Fiction

    What can I say? I don’t think I can add much more accolades to this novel than what has already been thrown out there. I hesitated in reading this because I knew there would be sexual violence and certain acts of mutilation I am uncomfortable with.

    I was starkly impressed with the gravity of the plot, the meandering nature of how the mystery unfolded.

    Great read...not always delightful but great.

    Check out this item

  • Frequency : the power of personal vibration by Peirce, Penney.
    ★★★★☆

    Reviewed by LaBae D on Feb 21, 2017

    Tagged: Body, Mind & Spirit

    This is one of those reads that stick to you through life and is easily applied to your day-to-day. I always fault myself for not taking notes during a read. Nonetheless, the main term that stuck with me and that I use as a centering tool is 'home frequency'.

    She uses this particular concept as a baseline to build on more complex theories and applications. The overall meaning of home frequency is just as it implies- locating your personal level of frequency/vibration. In recognizing the feeling of sitting in your home frequency; you will have the ability to manipulate your energy and be less susceptible to succumbing to outward energetic pulls (definitely useful as a public librarian).

    Towards the end of the book, however, I found she took the reader to a level that not all are prepared to traverse. The act of ascension is extremely powerful and is definitely not for the beginner energy worker. She should have saved the latter concepts for a more advanced book.    

    Definitely qualifies for re-read status.

    Check out this item

  • The Paris architect : a novel by Belfoure, Charles,
    ★★★★☆

    Reviewed by LaBae D on Feb 16, 2017

    Tagged: Fiction

    4.5 stars! Belfoure's background in architecture is evident in the intricate detail he uses to describe the creative processes and the ultimate pride one holds in the craft.

    Lucien Bernard is a struggling architect during German occupation who does not care much of the Jews. However, when offered the opportunity to use his talents to hide Jews in ingenous hiding places, he jumps at the opportunity; not necessarily because he cares but for the challenge and the money. He always insists that his current job will be his last but is driven by the challenge of fooling the Gestapo's and being considered a genius and upsetting his enemies. The thrill of the chase makes this book a page turner.

    I loved this book from beginning to end and learned quite a deal about the German occupation and architecture.

    Check out this item

  • The Lost City of the Monkey God by Preston, Douglas J.
    ★★★★★

    Reviewed by Teresa G on Feb 10, 2017

    Tagged: Environment & Nature History

    The Lost City of the Monkey God reveals the story of a twenty-first century expedition to a section of the Honduran rain forest where two ancient cities are discovered.  No one has been in this remote area in centuries, but through the use of Lidar, an advanced radar system implemented from the air, ground features that were obviously man-made have been revealed.  Just to battle the dense jungle is dangerous and difficult.  The investigative team must also be on the lookout for the aggressive and deadly fer-de-lance snake as well as a multitude of insects which could harbor deadly diseases. In fact Woody, one of the three British ex-Special Air Services officers hired to set up camp in the hostile jungle environment, killed a fer-de-lance in camp on the first day and many of the team members contracted a dangerous parasitic disease, leishmaniasis, which required special intensive treatment.  But, not one, but two cities were found.  A cache of artifacts that had lain undisturbed for centuries was uncovered.  This is a real-life adventure story with innumerable twists and turns.  I loved it!

    Check out this item

  • The Night Wanderer by Clare, Alys
    ★★★★★

    Reviewed by Teresa G on Jan 25, 2017

    Tagged: Fiction

    Lassair and lawman, Jack Chevestrier, must solve the brutal murders of several disparate Cambridge residents.  In the midst of the murders Gurdyman disappears.  As Lassair's romantic feelings for Jack grow she is unaware that Rollo is, at last, on his way back to England.  The historical setting is very well researched and detailed.  I thoroughly enjoy the herbal lore and study of alchemy.  I even found a bit that related to something I was studying in an online course, Magic in the MIddle Ages.  The Aelf Fen books are well written and a pleasure to read.

    Check out this item

  • Pax by Pennypacker, Sara
    ★★★☆☆

    Reviewed by Teresa G on Jan 25, 2017

    Tagged: Children

    Peter's father, who has enlisted in the army, forces his son to abandon Pax, the fox Peter has raised from a kit.  Peter instantly regrets not fighting harder for Pax and vows to return to the place he last saw the fox.  Hundreds of miles now cover the distance between them, but Peter knows Pax is still alive.  He must undergo an arduous journey to see Pax again.

    There are main stories in this book--the story of Peter and Pax and the greater story of the devastation of war.  Set in an unnamed location, the story line about the war doesn't have much depth.  The portrayal of what happens between Peter and Pax is more detailed and is the more powerful of the two story lines.  

    Check out this item

  • The Inquisitor's Tale, or, The Three Magical Children and Their Holy Dog by Gidwitz, Adam
    ★★★★☆

    Reviewed by Teresa G on Jan 10, 2017

    Tagged: Children

    Set in France in 1292 this book tells the story of three children who are brought together by circumstance.  William who is "part-Christian, part-Muslim; part-European, part-African" is a tall very dark skinned young monk.  Jacob is a Jewish boy whose parents have been murdered when his village is set on fire.  Jeanne is a peasant who suffers from epilepsy, but is thought to be possessed by evil spirits.  Jeanne is traveling with a white greyhound named Gwenforte who has died and come back to life.  Gwenforte is loosely based on the Legend of Guinefort, one of the "faithful dog" legends.  Gwenforte guides and helps the children as they join forces with another monk, Michelangelo di Bologna, to save all the Talmuds in France from being burned by King Louis IX.  

    So, I love the Middle Ages and The Inquisitor's Tale does an excellent job of capturing the history of the time in which it is set.  A lengthy author's note details the truth behind many of the events portrayed in the book.  And, more importantly, it has, as a central character, a greyhound and a historic one at that!  So why, then didn't I like this book more?  To be honest I am not a fan of slapstick humor and there is a fair amount of it here.  For me, this detracted from the story, but I'm sure it will make the book more interesting for the intended audience.  All in all a very well written story with some surprising twists and turns that are quite clever and unexpected.  

    Check out this item

  • Loner by Wayne, Teddy
    ★★☆☆☆

    Reviewed by Teresa G on Jan 10, 2017

    Tagged: Fiction

    I had to give this book two stars since I kept reading until the end...I kept hoping something would happen to make it worth the time investment.  I picked it off the 2016 NPR Book Concierge list so I was hoping for something a bit more engaging.  Loner tells the story of a young man, David Federman, who has worked all his life to get into Harvard.  His work has paid off and he begins his freshman year.  David has never quite fit in, but he tries.  He goes to bonding activities.  He seems to be making progress as the members of his new group of friends seem to truly like him.  When he sees Veronica Morgan Whelk at a social gathering he is smitten from the first minute he lays eyes on her.  When she turns out to be the roommate of one of his cadre of friends, Sara, he begins to deepen his relationship with Sara in order to get closer to Veronica.  He begins a stalking campaign to remain close to Veronica in the hopes that she will notice him.  He goes so far as to write papers for Veronica just so he can spend time with her.  But as time goes on his plan begins to backfire and, in the end, he discovers Veronica is using him as part of a social experiment she is doing for a class.  When he learns the truth about his place in Veronica's life he vows revenge.

    David is a thoroughly unlikable character as is the haughty Veronica.  I really didn't care about what happened to either of them.  I'm sure David's methods of stalking have been described accurately according to obsessive behavior.  I just became very tired of reading about his endless ploys to get close to his object of desire.  When he ruins his life and Veronica's in the end I really didn't care.

    Check out this item

  • Butcher Bird by Sykes, S. D.
    ★★★★☆

    Reviewed by Teresa G on Dec 16, 2016

    Tagged: Fiction

    Oswald de Lacy has another mystery to solve at Somershill Manor when a baby is found impaled on a thorn bush.  With many twists and turns and other mysteries along the way, the solution to this crime is not what the reader could ever imagine.  Oswald, at age 19, is beginning to grow up, but he is challenged at all turns as continues in his role of Lord of Somershill.  He misses his studies and the intellectual conversations at the monastery.  He finds life managing an estate in the wake of the plague difficult as more and more tenants move in order to gain higher wages.  Vacillating between doing what he knows is right for his tenants and holding to the Statute of Labourers which made it illegal to raise the wages higher than pre-plague levels, Oswald changes his mind again and again.  It is only upon the resolution of the mystery that he finds his way to do the right thing.  

    Excellent period detail and thorough research make this series a pleasure to read.  I'm hoping as Oswald grows to be a man, he will become a completely sympathetic character.  But presenting him as flawed and morally ambiguous at times lends more credence to the story.  I'm eagerly awaiting the next installment.

    Check out this item

  • Black Chalk by Yates, Christopher J.
    ★☆☆☆☆

    Reviewed by Teresa G on Dec 4, 2016

    Tagged: Fiction

    Insufferable.  I made it through about 75 pages before I gave up.  Switching between the present and the past, Black Chalk tells the story of "One Game, Six Students, Five Survivors."  This premise sounds intriguing, but the characters are thoroughly unlikable.  Jolyon, who begins the novel comes off as a whiner and his musings are torturous.  The flashbacks are slightly more engaging, but switching back and forth between the two advances the story extremely slowly.  I just couldn't stomach it for long.  I really didn't care which student didn't live nor did I care to find out more about what happened fourteen years ago when they were all playing "the game."  Sorry, NPR, you let this one slip through.

    Check out this item

  • Kings Rising by Pacat, C. S.
    ★★★★★

    Reviewed by Teresa G on Dec 4, 2016

    Tagged: Fiction

    Kings Rising is an absolutely fantastic ending to the Captive Prince Trilogy!  It is full of intrigue and honor and kept me guessing until the final pages.  Adventure abounds and just when the reader thinks all hope is lost a clever solution comes along.  Everything is believable, however.  I was reminded again and again of the adventures of Alec and Seregil in Lynn Flewelling's Nightrunner series, another series I thoroughly enjoyed.  And, just as I longed for more stories of Alec and Seregil, I now long to read more about Laurent and Damen. I was so sad to turn the last page in this trilogy.   

    Check out this item

  • Crosstalk by Willis, Connie
    ★★★☆☆

    Reviewed by Teresa G on Nov 22, 2016

    Tagged: Fiction

    If I could rate this book by half I would give the first 300 pages two stars and the last 298 pages four stars.  I had to average it out at three.  The premise is interesting--a future time when couples can have brain emplants so that they can communicate all feelings instantly and honestly.  But when Briddey and her social climbing boyfriend, Trent, decide to have it done, there are "unintended consequences."  The first part of the book is about two hundred pages too long--all the set up and description of Briddey and her wacky Irish-American family and their intrusion into her life goes on for far too long.  I grew weary of the stereotypical Irish-ness which was, I suppose, intended to be humorous.  If this had been just about any other author I would have given up long before reaching the half-way point.  That would have been a mistake since the second half of the book was everything the first half wasn't--gripping and compulsively readable.  After the midway point I thoroughly enjoyed the book and was happy I'd persevered (slogged) through.  

    Check out this item

  • Prince's Gambit by Pacat, C. S.
    ★★★★★

    Reviewed by Teresa G on Nov 22, 2016

    Tagged: Fiction

    Damen and Laurent set out for the border between Vere and Akielos on what seems a fool's errand.  Laurent must use all his resources to outsmart his uncle, the Regent even is one of those resources is his slave, Damen. It soon becomes apparent that Damen is no ordinary slave.  He has significant military knowledge and Laurent grows to trust him.  As the two grow closer Damen is haunted by the knowledge that revealing his true identity would forever break the bonds between the two men.  

    Where Captive Prince was centered around the palace culture of Vere, this book leaves that behind.  It is full of honor and tragedy.  I found this book to be totally captivating (ha! ha!) and one that I won't soon forget.

    Check out this item

  • The sleeping beauty killer by Clark, Mary Higgins,

    Reviewed by Tamoul Q on Nov 3, 2016

    Tagged: Fiction

    Casey Carter has paid her dues for killing Hunter Raleigh III even though she maintained her plea of innocence.  Later the story fascinates a journalist who vows to help Casey clear her repetition.  It’s a vow that places both Laurie Moran and Casey’s lives in danger.

    Check out this item

  • The award : a novel by Steel, Danielle,

    Reviewed by Tamoul Q on Nov 3, 2016

    Tagged: Fiction

    Sixteen year old Gaëlle de Barbet sees her best friend and her friends family marched off to an unknown fate by French soldiers. Later, German soldiers kill her father and brother while commandeering her family estate. Suddenly, long- time friends and supports become the new enemy and her mother descends into madness.  Taking her fate into her two hands, Gaëlle joins a resistance cell dedicated to delivering Jewish children to safety.

    Check out this item