Learn more about…


Lists

  • Evil dead 2
    The Evil Dead

    Reopen the book of the dead and try to survive the evil forces of the Deadites within the films and related media of The Evil Dead universe!

  • Spooky Movies at JEC

    Horror and other spooky movies and television shows available right now at Joseph E. Coleman Northwest Regional Library - just in time for Halloween!


Reviews

  • Pet by Emezi, Akwaeke,
    ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Jam is a teenage girl who lives in Lucille, a post-revolutionary town where social justice driven "angels" have defeated the "monsters" of our time and created a town where girls like Jam can live freely as themselves in safety and prosperity. Jam, who is autistic, did not speak as a baby, and the adults in Lucille accepted her as she is and taught her sign language. When she said at three-year-old that she was a girl, not a boy, the adults in Lucille accepted her as she is and, when she approached puberty, gave her free choice over which kind of puberty she wanted to go through. Life in Lucille is good, although all of the adults are cagey about how they got there. They don't talk about the things the "monsters" used to do, or what the "angels," many of whom are still alive, had to do to win the civil war. One day, a terrifying monster named Pet emerges from one of Jam's mother's paintings, and, communicating telepathically, tells Jam that it is hunting a "real monster" living in Lucille.The adults insist Pet must be wrong, that there are no more monsters in Lucille; but Pet tells Jam the monster lives in the home of her best friend, Remembrance; so Jam reluctantly, secretly, teams up with Pet to hunt down the monster, whoever it is.
    Pet is not a dystopia novel. It is a novel about the trauma that lingers even when something resembling utopia has been achieved. Pet is about what happens when trauma is allowed to fester, and goes unaddressed. It's a novel about healing. It shows us a better world, and reminds us that nothing can truly be perfect either. I am a grown adult and I cried when I read this book. Personally, my new favorite book. Read Pet.

    Reviewed by Shelley R on Sep 28, 2021

    Check out this item

  • Pet by Emezi, Akwaeke,
    ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Jam is a teenage girl who lives in Lucille, a post-revolutionary town where social justice driven "angels" have defeated the "monsters" of our time and created a town where girls like Jam can live freely as themselves in safety and prosperity. Jam, who is autistic, did not speak as a baby, and the adults in Lucille accepted her as she is and taught her sign language. When she said at three-year-old that she was a girl, not a boy, the adults in Lucille accepted her as she is and, when she approached puberty, gave her free choice over which kind of puberty she wanted to go through. Life in Lucille is good, although all of the adults are cagey about how they got there. They don't talk about the things the "monsters" used to do, or what the "angels," many of whom are still alive, had to do to win the civil war. One day, a terrifying monster named Pet emerges from one of Jam's mother's paintings, and, communicating telepathically, tells Jam that it is hunting a "real monster" living in Lucille.The adults insist Pet must be wrong, that there are no more monsters in Lucille; but Pet tells Jam the monster lives in the home of her best friend, Remembrance; so Jam reluctantly, secretly, teams up with Pet to hunt down the monster, whoever it is.
    Pet is not a dystopia novel. It is a novel about the trauma that lingers even when something resembling utopia has been achieved. Pet is about what happens when trauma is allowed to fester, and goes unaddressed. It's a novel about healing. It shows us a better world, and reminds us that nothing can truly be perfect either. I am a grown adult and I cried when I read this book. Personally, my new favorite book. Read Pet.

    Reviewed by Shelley R on Sep 28, 2021

    Check out this item

  • Pet by Emezi, Akwaeke.
    ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Jam is a teenage girl who lives in Lucille, a post-revolutionary town where social justice driven "angels" have defeated the "monsters" of our time and created a town where girls like Jam can live freely as themselves in safety and prosperity. Jam, who is autistic, did not speak as a baby, and the adults in Lucille accepted her as she is and taught her sign language. When she said at three-year-old that she was a girl, not a boy, the adults in Lucille accepted her as she is and, when she approached puberty, gave her free choice over which kind of puberty she wanted to go through. Life in Lucille is good, although all of the adults are cagey about how they got there. They don't talk about the things the "monsters" used to do, or what the "angels," many of whom are still alive, had to do to win the civil war. One day, a terrifying monster named Pet emerges from one of Jam's mother's paintings, and, communicating telepathically, tells Jam that it is hunting a "real monster" living in Lucille.The adults insist Pet must be wrong, that there are no more monsters in Lucille; but Pet tells Jam the monster lives in the home of her best friend, Remembrance; so Jam reluctantly, secretly, teams up with Pet to hunt down the monster, whoever it is.
    Pet is not a dystopia novel. It is a novel about the trauma that lingers even when something resembling utopia has been achieved. Pet is about what happens when trauma is allowed to fester, and goes unaddressed. It's a novel about healing. It shows us a better world, and reminds us that nothing can truly be perfect either. I am a grown adult and I cried when I read this book. Personally, my new favorite book. Read Pet.

    Reviewed by Shelley R on Sep 28, 2021

    Check out this item

  • Finna by Cipri, Nino,
    ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Ava and Jules both work at LitenVärld, a Swedish furniture store akin to IKEA, and they just had a very messy break-up. Ava's plans to avoid Jules at work are thwarted when a wormhole opens up to another LitenVärld in a parallel universe and swallows up Ursula Nouri, the kindly grandmother of a customer. Apparently, wormholes open up in LitenVärld all the time, due to their "unique showroom layouts." Store associates are required to enter the wormholes to retrieve lost customers, chosen by reverse seniority. They get a Pasta and Friends gift card if they accept the mission, and fired if they don't. After watching a cheesy training video from the 80s, Ava and Jules are sent out into the wormhole to find Ursula Nouri, equipped with their Pasta and Friends gift cards and a tracking device called a FINNA that will point them to Ursula Nouri's whereabouts, or if not her, a "suitable replacement" so that customers won't learn the truth. LitenVärld's insurance won't cover "acts of god." Along the way, Ava and Jules work through the conflicts that lead to their break-up and try to patch things up enough to be friends again.

    Full of skin-crawling creepy imagery, touching personal moments, flawed yet lovable and relatable characters, hillarious writing, and a bit of biting commentary on the retail industry; FINNA is a short and sweet novella you'll find yourself recommending to all of your friends. If you like Ursula K. LeGuin's short stories, you will love FINNA. If you've ever had a messy queer break-up where you still care about each other but can't seem to stop hurting each other: you will find FINNA painfully relatable and perhaps incredibly cathartic and healing.

    Reviewed by Shelley R on Sep 28, 2021

    Check out this item

  • Finna by Cipri, Nino,
    ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    Ava and Jules both work at LitenVärld, a Swedish furniture store akin to IKEA, and they just had a very messy break-up. Ava's plans to avoid Jules at work are thwarted when a wormhole opens up to another LitenVärld in a parallel universe and swallows up Ursula Nouri, the kindly grandmother of a customer. Apparently, wormholes open up in LitenVärld all the time, due to their "unique showroom layouts." Store associates are required to enter the wormholes to retrieve lost customers, chosen by reverse seniority. They get a Pasta and Friends gift card if they accept the mission, and fired if they don't. After watching a cheesy training video from the 80s, Ava and Jules are sent out into the wormhole to find Ursula Nouri, equipped with their Pasta and Friends gift cards and a tracking device called a FINNA that will point them to Ursula Nouri's whereabouts, or if not her, a "suitable replacement" so that customers won't learn the truth. LitenVärld's insurance won't cover "acts of god." Along the way, Ava and Jules work through the conflicts that lead to their break-up and try to patch things up enough to be friends again.

    Full of skin-crawling creepy imagery, touching personal moments, flawed yet lovable and relatable characters, hillarious writing, and a bit of biting commentary on the retail industry; FINNA is a short and sweet novella you'll find yourself recommending to all of your friends. If you like Ursula K. LeGuin's short stories, you will love FINNA. If you've ever had a messy queer break-up where you still care about each other but can't seem to stop hurting each other: you will find FINNA painfully relatable and perhaps incredibly cathartic and healing.

    Reviewed by Shelley R on Sep 28, 2021

    Check out this item

  • Redwood and Ponytail by Holt, K. A.
    ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

    This was a beautifully-written novel in verse. I loved seeing both Tam and Kate's points of view. It was funny, realistic, sad, and uplifting all at once. I have a feeling this book will be one of those "books at the right time" for a lot of kids struggling to understand who they are and what they feel. As it says in the end, there is no such thing as normal and love is love is love is love.

    Reviewed by Mary W on Sep 13, 2021

    Check out this item