Posts in “a-history-minute” (44)

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If ever a man simply wore himself out while serving his country, Franklin D. Roosevelt is his name. First elected during the depths of the Great Depression in 1932, he was still on the job twelve… continue reading A Dying Man Runs for President

By written by Richard L.    August 12, 2020   

During the years that Dwight Eisenhower served as Supreme Allied Commander in Europe, he had to contend with some of the most demanding and difficult personalities on two continents.  The… continue reading President Eisenhower, Senator McCarthy, and "The Junketeering Gumshoes"

By written by Richard L.    August 5, 2020    1

Women today often talk about the difficulty of "having it all", but Sadie T.M. Alexander was more concerned with "doing it all." She not only raised two children and worked to… continue reading A History Minute: The Many Firsts of Sadie T. M. Alexander

By written by Sally F.    March 31, 2020   

The Philadelphia Flower Show was the first public flower show held in the U.S. and it has become the largest and longest-running flower show in the world. The seed that became the Philadelphia… continue reading Oldest, Biggest, Best: A History of the Philadelphia Flower Show

By written by Sally F.    February 27, 2020   

In preparation for a special Free Library event taking place this Wednesday, January 15 at Lovett Library , today we'll be looking at the history and architecture of Mt. Airy. The neighborhood… continue reading Neighborhood Beginnings: 11 Things You Should Know About Mt. Airy

By written by Sally F.    January 13, 2020    5

For over 50 years, Mae’s Millinery (definition: "the art of hat-making") was a fixture in Philadelphia, a destination for women from up and down the East Coast in search of the… continue reading A History Minute | Who was Mae Reeves and Why is She in the Smithsonian?

By written by Sally F.    December 26, 2019    5

Philadelphia has and always will be a city of neighborhoods. In our ongoing series of Neighborhood Beginnings, today we'll be discussing a section of the city that was once referred to as...… continue reading Neighborhood Beginnings: from Pigs to Pigskin - 11 Things You Might Not Know About "The Neck"

By written by Sally F.    November 22, 2019   

"Stronger, lighter, safer" was the goal Edward Budd pursued his entire life. Along the way he built the largest manufacturing company in Philadelphia and forever changed the way the… continue reading A History Minute | Fortunes of Philadelphia: Planes, Trains, and Automobiles – The Story of Budd Manufacturing

By written by Sally F.    August 9, 2019    3

The Oak Lane area of North West Philadelphia has an rich history of unique architecture and noteworthy residents. East Oak Lane spans from Cheltenhan Avenue to Godfrey Avenue and from Broad Street… continue reading Neighborhood Beginnings: from Barnyards to Broadway in East Oak Lane

By written by Sally F.    June 26, 2019    5

War runs on credit and the money it produces. Without money, weapons can’t be bought, ships can’t be built, soldiers can’t be fed, and the war is lost. In the first 100 years of… continue reading A History Minute | The Fortunes of War - The Philadelphia Bankers Who Saved Our Nation

By written by Sally F.    May 9, 2019    1

What do you think of when you hear the words "May Day"? (And no, I don’t mean the distress call "mayday," which comes from m’aidir , French for "help… continue reading May Day! Mayday? May Day!

By written by Clare F.    May 1, 2019   

Philadelphia has been a major center of international commerce for over 300 years. Even today, with major port complexes serving major metropolitan centers throughout the country, Philadelphia and… continue reading A History Minute | 14 Surprising Facts about the Port of Philadelphia

By written by Sally F.    March 28, 2019    2

The last decades of the 19th century produced a backlash that diminished much of the progress made by blacks in the south after emancipation and led large numbers to travel to the… continue reading A History Minute | The Armstrong Association and The Berean Enterprise

By written by Sally F.    February 12, 2019    1

Washington Avenue Immigration Station: 1873-1915 I n 1870, Philadelphia was no longer the nation’s largest city, but rather the "Workshop of the World" with an endless need for… continue reading A History Minute | Philadelphia's Ellis Island

By written by Sally F.    December 19, 2018    4

It's that time of year again, where we "Fall back" and set our clocks back an hour as Daylight Saving Time ends on Sunday, November 4, at 2:00 a.m. Although we gain an hour of sleep,… continue reading A History Minute: 13 Things You Didn't Know About Daylight Saving Time

By written by Sally F.    November 2, 2018   

As we enter into the yearly flu season here in the United States, it was 100 years ago that Philadelphia itself was the epicenter of a world health pandemic. Young people in the prime of their… continue reading A History Minute: 11 Things You Should Know About the Spanish Flu Epidemic of 1918

By written by Sally F.    October 25, 2018   

This year's National Skyscraper Day falls on Labor Day, as good a day as any to fully appreciate the architectural marvels, engineering efforts, and skilled labor that make up our cities. If… continue reading 9 Things You Should Know About Philadelphia Skyscrapers

By written by Sally F.    August 31, 2018    2

In these days of big bucks baseball, with the top players making over $30 million a year and the top clubs valued in the billions, it’s hard to imagine a time when America’s Pastime… continue reading A History Minute | The Fortunes of Philadelphia - Let's Play Ball!

By written by Sally F.    July 17, 2018    1

In our ongoing series of historical posts about Philadelphia neighborhoods, today we bring you our neighbors to the northwest, Germantown...   Germantown was the first permanent German… continue reading A History Minute: 11 Things You Should Know About Germantown

By written by Sally F.    June 5, 2018    6