Posts by Sally F. (24)

Washington Avenue Immigration Station: 1873-1915 I n 1870, Philadelphia was no longer the nation’s largest city, but rather the "Workshop of the World" with an endless need for… continue reading

By Sally F.   December 19, 2018    4

It's that time of year again, where we "Fall back" and set our clocks back an hour as Daylight Saving Time ends on Sunday, November 4, at 2:00 a.m. Although we gain an hour of sleep,… continue reading

By Sally F.   November 2, 2018   

As we enter into the yearly flu season here in the United States, it was 100 years ago that Philadelphia itself was the epicenter of a world health pandemic. Young people in the prime of their… continue reading

By Sally F.   October 25, 2018   

This year's National Skyscraper Day falls on Labor Day, as good a day as any to fully appreciate the architectural marvels, engineering efforts, and skilled labor that make up our cities. If… continue reading

By Sally F.   August 31, 2018   

In these days of big bucks baseball, with the top players making over $30 million a year and the top clubs valued in the billions, it’s hard to imagine a time when America’s Pastime… continue reading

By Sally F.   July 17, 2018    1

In our ongoing series of historical posts about Philadelphia neighborhoods, today we bring you our neighbors to the northwest, Germantown...   Germantown was the first permanent German… continue reading

By Sally F.   June 5, 2018    4

Science is the star this week around Philly, with the start of the annual Philadelphia Science Festival beginning this past weekend. We thought we would delve deep into our book stacks and search… continue reading

By Sally F.   April 23, 2018   

If you don't know the name Amalie Emmy Noether, you're not alone . Suffice to say, she was and remains one of the greatest minds of the 20th century. Read on to learn more about this… continue reading

By Sally F.   March 29, 2018   

William Penn was a dreamer. Like many attracted to the New World, he was a member of a persecuted religious minority—the Quakers. But unlike the Puritans and Catholics who founded religious… continue reading

By Sally F.   March 16, 2018   

As Head Designer of Horace Trumbauer’s architecture firm, Julian Abele designed the Free Library and the Philadelphia Art Museum and set the tone for the entire parkway. He designed… continue reading

By Sally F.   February 7, 2018    6

The Fish It all started with the fish. Like salmon, shad are born in fresh water, spend several years growing in the ocean, then return to their birthplace to spawn. The largest breeding… continue reading

By Sally F.   January 10, 2018   

Chances are you have driven, biked, run, walked, or partied on Kelly Drive, but have you ever wondered where it got its name? No, it’s not named for Grace Kelly , movie star and princess.… continue reading

By Sally F.   November 16, 2017   

In the beginning Philadelphia was a river town. William’s Penn’s plan stretched from river to river, but the population clung to the shores of the Delaware and the docks and ships that… continue reading

By Sally F.   October 26, 2017   

On Sept. 26, 2017, the fence will come down and a new statue will be unveiled: the first new City Hall statue since 1923 and the first of an African American on any city-owned public… continue reading

By Sally F.   September 22, 2017   

Overbrook gets its name  from a train station built over a brook. This is quite appropriate, as it was the Pennsylvania Railroad that bought trolley rights  to Lancaster Avenue from 52nd… continue reading

By Sally F.   August 21, 2017    4

Almost 100 years before Ellis Island, Philadelphia established The Lazaretto Station. It became the point of entry for all ships and passengers arriving during the quarantine season of June… continue reading

By Sally F.   August 7, 2017    5

Philadelphia is a city of neighborhoods and Olney is a neighborhood of cultures. Today Olney is the most diverse  of Philadelphia’s neighborhoods and its 5th Street business corridor… continue reading

By Sally F.   July 26, 2017    4

18th century Philadelphia was primarily a port city, its wealth based on imports and exports from all over the world. At the time of the American Revolution, the city’s major trading… continue reading

By Sally F.   July 18, 2017   

By 1800, Philadelphia was not only the Cradle of Liberty but the center of American manufacturing and innovation. It was the kind of place a young man of vision who was not afraid to get his hands… continue reading

By Sally F.   July 10, 2017    3

Mid-19th century Philadelphia was booming. Its factories produced iron and steel, locomotives and textiles, and finished goods of all kinds. Immigrants and citizens alike flowed into the city to… continue reading

By Sally F.   June 21, 2017