Castner Scrapbook v.9, Hospitals, Charitable, page 5

Historical Images of Philadelphia Castner Scrapbook Collection
Advanced
Castner Scrapbook v.9, Hospitals, Charitable, page 5

Item Info

Item No: pdcc02427
Title: Castner Scrapbook v.9, Hospitals, Charitable, page 5
Historic Street Address: 18th & Cherry Streets
Historic Street Address: 18th & Lombard Streets
Historic Street Address: 20th & Hamilton Streets
Historic Street Address: 23rd & Brown Streets, Northeast corner
Media Type: Scrapbooks
Source: Print and Picture Collection
Notes:

Item pdcc00783, middle left [image dimensions 7.3 cm x 8.8 cm]:

http://www.uphs.upenn.edu/paharc/timeline/1801/tline10.html

Depicts the lying-in hospital for "indigent married women of good moral character."  The  Preston Retreat was founded in 1865 through the bequest of the 19th century obstetrician and philanthropist Dr. Jonas Preston. One of the roles of the institution was to provide a training site for student nurses affiliated to the University of Pennsylvania Hospital. The building was designed by celebrated architect Thomas Ustick Walter. Although the building was completed in 1840, it wasn't until 1866 that the institution opened.

Building demolished: YES 1963


Notes:

Item pdcc00784, top left [image dimensions 7.0 cm x 10.7 cm]:

http://www.uphs.upenn.edu/paharc/timeline/1801/tline10.html

Halftone reproduction of photograph from King's Views of Philadelphia, published by Moses King, 1900. Shows the facade of Preston Retreat, a lying-in hospital for "indigent married women of good moral character." Named after 19th century obstetrician and philanthropist Dr. Jonas Preston, the institution also served as a training site for nurses of the University of Pennsylvania Hospital. The building was designed by notable architect Thomas Ustick Walter.

Building demolished: YES 1963


Notes:

Item pdcc00785, bottom left [image dimensions 10.5 cm x 11.5 cm]:

The Northern Home for the Friendless children was incorporated in 1854 for "the laudable and benevolent purpose of educating and providing for friendless children." After the Civil War, the institution's name was changed to include orphans of soldiers and sailors.  The building depicted was designed by architect Samuel Sloan in collaboration with carpenter John Stewart.

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~mjwanc/northern.htm


Notes:

Item pdcc00786m top right [image dimensions 10.2 cm x 11.2 cm]:

Halftone reproduction of photograph showing an illustration of  the building constructed in 1890 to house The Polyclinic Hospital, which was founded in 1882 to offer graduate level instruction in medicine and surgery. In 1917 the college merged with the University of Pennsylvania to become part of Graduate Hospital.


Notes:

Item pdcc00787, bottom right [image dimensions 18.0 cm x 12.1 cm]:

A print depicting the Orphan Asylum building which stood at the corner of Eighteenth and Cherry Streets. Built in 1817, the brick structure burned down in 1822 killing 23 of the 106 children living in the facility. A new building, designed by architect William Strickland, was built the same year.

The print was made for publication in the Port Folio, a magazine which ran from 1801 through 1827 "Devoted to Useful Science, the Liberal Arts, Legitimate Criticism, and Polite Literature."


Geocode Latitude: Geocode Latitude:39.956126
Geocode Longitude:-75.169349

Call Number: A917.481 P536 v.9
Creator Name: Castner, Samuel, Jr., 1843-1929 - Compiler
Telfer, Robert - Engraver
Walter, Thomas Ustick, 1804-1887 - Architect
Sloan, Samuel, 1815-1884 - Architect
Strickland, William, 1788-1854 - Architect